Portraits of #CIRTL15

I had the pleasure of attending the CIRTL Network‘s conference, “Preparing the Future STEM Faculty for the Rapidly Changing Landscape of Higher Education” at Texas A&M in College Station, TX on April 12 – 14, 2015.

It was a great meeting with a lively Twitter backchannel using hashtag #CIRTL15. My friend, Derek Bruff @derekbruff, archived the Twitter traffic and I’ll update this post when he shares it.

Speaking of Derek, he’s really good at drawing #sketchnotes, that is, recordingĀ  presentations in pictures and words. Here’s his summary of Anya Kamenetz’ keynote on the future of higher education.

I’m an amateur sketchnoter, too, but I’m not good enough to sketch entire presentations yet. Instead, I try to draw the people giving the presentations. I’m deliberately practicing getting better at remembering people’s names and drawing them seems to help. So, here are many of the people who spoke at #CIRTL15. I know I missed a few. And my apologies if you’re in this collection and you don’t look anything this ;) Whenever possible, I linked to their presentations, all of which are available on the CIRTL Forum website.

 

Randy Bass

Randy Bass

Randy Bass
Associate Provost and Professor of English, Georgetown University
Plenary Address: In the Crystal Ball: What will Higher Education Look Like in 2030?

Derek Bruff’s sketchnote of Randy’s presentation


Benjamin Flores

Benjamin Flores

Benjamin Flores
Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering
University of Texas at El Paso
What Do Current Demographic Trends Predict for the Students of 2030?

 


Jennifer Glass

Jennifer Glass

Jennifer Glass
Professor of Sociology, University of Texas, Austin
Panelist: How do we prepare future faculty in the context of changing demographics?
The Future of the STEM Labor Force: Implications for Training and Curriculum


Peggy Shadduck

Peggy Shadduck

Peggy Shadduck
Director of the Dallas Community College District STEM Institute
Panelist: How do we prepare future faculty in the context of changing demographics?
Focus on 2-Year College Students


Olufunmilayo Adebayo

Olufunmilayo Adebayo

Olufunmilayo Adebayo
Graduate Student, Biomedical Engineering, Cornell University
Panelist: How do we prepare future faculty in the context of changing demographics?
How can we effectively make mentorship and sponsorship training, a part of the graduate student experience?


GeorgeSiemens_CIRTL15

George Siemens

George Siemens @gsiemens
Executive Director of the LINK Research Lab, University of Texas at Arlington
How Do We Best Utilize the Teaching Technologies Yet to Come?

Derek Bruff’s sketchnotes of George’s presentation


Emilianne CcCranie

Emilianne CcCranie

Emilieanne McCranie
Graduate Student, Chemistry, Vanderbilt University
Panelist: How do we prepare future faculty in the context of technological changes?
In Search of Experience: One graduate student’s quest for a teaching philosophy


Derek Bruff

Derek Bruff

Derek Bruff @derekbruff
Director, Center for Teaching, Vanderbilt University
Panel Moderator and Panelist: How do we prepare future faculty in the context of technological changes?
MOOCs as Networks of Local Learning Communities


Jim Julius

Jim Julius

Jim Julius @jjulius
Faculty Director of Online Education, Miracosta College
Panelist: How do we prepare future faculty in the context of technological changes?
A Community College Perspective


Anya Kamenetz

Anya Kamenetz

Anya Kamenetz @anya1anya
Author and Education Reporter, NPR
Keynote: The Future of Higher Education: People, Practices, Tools (linked to Derek Bruff’s sketchnotes)


Mary Deane Sorcinelli

Mary Deane Sorcinelli

Mary Deane Sorcinelli
Distinguished Scholar in Residence, Mt. Holyoke Wiessman Center for Leadership
The Future of the Professoriate: How Must We Change?

(Derek Bruff’s sketchnotes of Mary Deane’s presentation)


Katie Kearns

Katie Kearns

Katie Kearns @kkearns23
Senior Instructional Consultant, Indiana University Bloomington Center for Teaching and Learning
Panelist: How do we prepare future faculty for the changing nature of teaching positions in higher education?
Intersections of Identity and Instruction


Allison Rober

Allison Rober

Alison Rober
Assistant Professor of Biology, Ball State
Panelist: How do we prepare future faculty for the changing nature of teaching positions in higher education? University


Myles Boylan

Myles Boylan

Myles Boylan @myles_boylan
Program Director, National Science Foundation
Panelist: How do we prepare future faculty for the changing nature of teaching positions in higher education? University
At the NSF, we are interested in changing graduate education for the better


Suzanne Ortega

Suzanne Ortega

Suzanne Ortega @sortegaCGS
President, Council of Graduate Schools
Closing Reflection


Bob Mathieu

Bob Mathieu

Bob Mathieu
Director, CIRTL
Closing Discussion


Crystal Dozier

Crystal Dozier

Crystal Dozier @ArchaeoCrystal
Graduate Student, Archaeology, Texas A&M University
Patterns of Efficacy of Teaching Concepts of Race in Anthropology


One last sketch. Bob Mathieu reminded us again and again about the CIRTL Mission:

To enhance excellence in undergraduate education through the development of a national faculty committed to implementing and advancing effective teaching practices for diverse learners as part of successful and varied professional careers.

With my life-long interest in astronomy and space exploration, I couldn’t help but draw a CIRTL mission patch.

A mission patch for CIRTL

What’s a mission without a mission patch?

That’s my portrait(s) of #CIRTL15. Again, my apologies if I made anyone look too old, too young, too ogre-like, too anything. And if, by chance, you see yourself here and want to use my sketch, go ahead. I’m sharing them under a Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) 4.0 International License.

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Hello, my name is Prof–, no Doc–, no, ugh.

I have the pleasure of teaching a course at UC San Diego called “The College Classroom.” It’s a course for graduate students and postdocs about teaching and learning in higher education. Sometimes it’s theoretical, like when we talk about constructivism or mindset, sometimes it’s practical, like when we talk about various evidence-based instructional strategies, and sometimes it’s extremely practical, like what to do and say on the first day of class of the course you’re teaching.

(Image by Peter Newbury)

(Illustration by Peter Newbury)

On that first day of class, when you’ve finally created sufficient materials, found the classroom, figured out how to connect the &%@# adapter to your laptop to display your slides, and at last, flip on the microphone — yeah, at that moment, you’re not at your best. You’re nervous and exhausted and excited and… And that’s not the moment when you want to be making important decisions that will impact the rest of the course.

So, I prompt my students to think NOW about those decisions, especially:

I prompt students to think NOW about what they want their students to call them.

I prompt students to think NOW about what they want their students to call them.

I use clickers to gather their choices, not because there’s a right answer but because it encourages everyone to think and commit (for now) and click, and the spread in the votes demonstrates there’s no one correct answer. The discussion following the vote is rich.

So many possibilities

Here’s as many of my students rationales as I can remember. I’ll use pretend instructors Michael (Mike) Jones and Elizabeth (Beth) Smith as examples.

  • My students are graduate students and postdocs, recall. Almost all of them were uncomfortable with Professor. We all know that “professor” is a title you earn at university through tenure-track and tenure positions. “Professor” means a lot and no one wants to misrepresent their status and level of achievement. I totally agree. But students are likely to call you Professor because that’s who teaches at university, right? When a student raises his hand and asks, “Professor Smith, could you explain how you got that again?” he’s not expecting this

    Oh, sure. But first, let me say I’m not actually a “professor” because I’m still working on my thesis. Once I defend and find an tenure-track position — fingers crossed, have you seen how competitive the market is — then I’ll use professor. But back to your question…

    This is why you should decide now what you want your students to call you, and let them know.

  • Same goes for “Dr. Jones,” say the graduate students inĀ  my class. That’s a title that’s earned through hard work that they have not yet completed. No one wants to falsify their credentials.
  • Many of female graduate students feel they’re stuck with “Elizabeth” (or “Beth” if only your grandmother calls you “Elizabeth”) because they’re uncomfortable with “Miss Smith.” They often feel they must work extra hard to establish their credentials and gain the respect of their students, and “Miss” seems like it works against that.
  • I recently heard of 2 situations where the women in my class are okay with “Miss”:
    • One woman says she’s been teaching in high school and there, she uses “Miss Beth” with her students.
    • Another woman in my class, a person-of-color, says in her community, “Miss Beth” is a sign of respect and an accepted way for a student to address a teacher.
  • Many deliberate chose to use their casual, first names like Mike or Beth because they want to create a more collegial feel in the classroom, trying to remove the barrier between students and instructor.
  • When I was teaching, I also told them what I didn’t want to be called because Vancouver already had a Dr. Peter and he deserves every morsel of recognition and respect he earned through his outreach.
  • I think everyone in my classes saw, like so many other aspects of working in higher eduction, it’s easier for the male instructors to make this decision.

And that’s really the point of this whole exercise in my class – to make a decision. Now. When you’ve got time and you’re thinking straight.

Do you teach? What do your students call you? Why did you pick that name?

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Teaching students to think like experts – CSUgrit Symposium

I have the pleasure of facilitating a pre-conference workshop at the Cal State University LA Symposium on University Teaching. My thanks to Beverly Bondad-Brown, Cat Haras, and Adrienne Lopez at CSULA’s Center for Effective Teaching and Learning.

CSUGrit_logo

I’ll be talking about how to get your students thinking in expert-like ways by using peer instruction (“clickers”). Peer instruction is a powerful, versatile, evidence-based instructional strategy that lets you turn your classroom into, as Ken Bain says in What the best college teachers do, (2004) a place where “students encounter safe yet challenging conditions in which they can try, fail, receive feedback, and try again without facing a summative evaluation.” (p. 108)

Students need opportunities to try, fail, receive feedback, and try again before facing a summative evaluation (Ken Bain, 2004). (Graphic by Peter Newbury)

Students need opportunities to try, fail, receive feedback, and try again before facing a summative evaluation (Ken Bain, 2004). (Graphic by Peter Newbury)

Workshop Resources

  • Here’s a summary (PDF) of the key findings from How People Learn
  • This is a collection of peer instruction questions to critique during the workshop. Watch out – some of these are good and some are bad!

 

  • Here are the workshop slides.

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